AED

Basic Life Support(BLS) Certification in Los Angeles

The Basic Life Support (BLS) for Healthcare Providers Classroom Course is designed to provide a wide variety of healthcare professionals the ability to recognize several life-threatening emergencies, provide CPR, use an AED, and relieve choking in a safe, timely and effective manner.

  • Key changes in basic life support, reflecting the new science from the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care
  • Critical concepts of high-quality CPR
  • The American Heart Association Chain of Survival
  • 1-Rescuer CPR and AED for adult, child and infant
  • 2-Rescuer CPR and AED for adult, child and infant
  • Differences between adult, child and infant rescue techniques
  • Bag-mask techniques for adult, child and infant
  • Rescue breathing for adult, child and infant
  • Relief of choking for adult, child and infant
  • CPR with an advanced airway*
  • This is an introduction to the compression/ventilation rate and ratio for a patient who has an advanced airway in place. For more information on advanced airways, please refer to the Airway Management Course.
aed-certification
What is an AED?
The automated external defibrillator (AED) is a computerized medical device. An AED can check a person’s heart rhythm. It can recognize a rhythm that requires a shock. And it can advise the rescuer when a shock is needed. The AED uses voice prompts, lights and text messages to tell the rescuer the steps to take.
AEDs are very accurate and easy to use. With a few hours of training anyone can learn to operate an AED safely. There are many different brands of AEDs, but the same basic steps apply to all of them. The AHA does not recommend a specific model.What’s the AHA position on placement of AEDs?
The AHA strongly advocates that all EMS first-response vehicles and ambulances be equipped with an AED or another defibrillation device (semiautomatic or manual defibrillator). The AHA also supports placing AEDs in targeted public areas such as sports arenas, gated communities, office complexes, doctor’s offices, shopping malls, etc. When AEDs are placed in the community or a business or facility, the AHA strongly encourages that they be part of a defibrillation program in which:Persons that acquire an AED notify the local EMS office.
A licensed physician or medical authority provides medical oversight to ensure quality control.
Persons responsible for using the AED are trained in CPR and how to use an AED.

Why should people who are responsible for operating an AED receive CPR training?
Early CPR is an integral part of providing lifesaving aid to people suffering sudden cardiac arrest. CPR helps to circulate oxygen-rich blood to the brain. After the AED is attached and delivers a shock, the typical AED will prompt the operator to continue CPR while the device continues to analyze the victim.

If AEDs are so easy to use, why do people need formal training in how to use them?
An AED operator must know how to recognize the signs of a sudden cardiac arrest, when to activate the EMS system, and how to do CPR. It’s also important for operators to receive formal training on the AED model they will use so that they become familiar with the device and are able to successfully operate it in an emergency. Training also teaches the operator how to avoid potentially hazardous situations.

Can AEDs be used on children?
Children over age 8 can be treated with a standard AED. For children ages 1-8, the AHA recommends the pediatric attenuated pads that are purchased separately.

aed